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Siebel Si 204

Siebel Si 204

The Siebel Si 204 was a twin engine, cabin monoplane used for light transport, liasion or instrument training roles. It was also used in general training of twin engine pilots, navigators and radio operators. During the occupation of France they were built by the Societe Nationale de Constructions Aeronautiques du Centre which left the Siebel Company free to concentrate on the production of trainers. The Si 204 was powered by two Argus As 411 12-cylinder inverted-vee, air-cooled engines, each at 600HP. The crew of two sat in the glazed nose, but when used as a radio trainer, accomodations were provided for five trainees with all their equipment in the waist. It had a maximum speed of 230 mph and a range of 930 miles. The particular plane pictured here was part of a large collection of Luftwaffe aircraft pooled together by the Allies after the war. The location of this Luftwaffe boneyard was about 12 miles south of Munich along the A8 autobahn near a village called Brunnthal. Many of the aircraft found there were operating from a Schattenplatz or "shadow" field; a diversionary field serving as an alternative to the fields at Munich-Neubiberg and Munich-Riem which were under near constant aerial attack at this late stage of the war. (N. Loy and M. Hundt, personal communications, 2008, 2010) Also noteworthy is the "Blinde Kuh" (Blind Cow) emblem painted below the pilot's side window and the double yellow bands painted around the fuselage signifying that this plane was used in a "Blindflugschule" or blind flying school -- an instrument flying school. (S. Sheflin, personal communication, 2000).


Sources: Jane's Fighting Aircraft Of World War II. New Jersey: Crescent Books, 1994.
Ivie, Tom. "Roundup In The Sky" Airfoil - A Journal Dedicated To Flight. Volume 1. Number 3 (1985)