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DECORATIONS AND DEVICES

This page highlights the various awards earned by my grandfather, Jerry Pinkowski and also his miscellaneous uniform devices. If you're researching a family member who served in the 347th Ordnance Depot Company, it's most likely they should have received the five medals (or corresponding ribbons) shown here. Members of the 347th should have received a silver battle star to their "EAME" ribbon signifying the five campaigns they participated in: Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland and Central Europe. Also, the company spent about five months around Nuremberg after the war and any members during this time should have been eligible for the Army of Occupation Medal, even if their separation papers may not indicate it. To actually receive the medal though, you may have to provide proof to the NPRC. I'm currently in that process, I'll be sure to update here after I find out how it went.

ARMY GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL
The Good Conduct Medal is awarded to any active-duty enlisted member of the United States military who completes three consecutive years of "honorable and faithful service". Such service implies that a standard enlistment was completed without any non-judicial punishments, disciplinary infractions, or court martial offenses. During times of war, the Good Conduct Medal may be awarded for one year of faithful service.

AMERICAN CAMPAIGN MEDAL
To be awarded the American Campaign Medal, a service member was required to either perform one year of duty within the continental borders of the United States, or perform 30 days consecutive/60 non-consecutive days of duty outside the borders of the United States but within the American Theater of Operations. The eligibility dates of the American Campaign Medal were from December 7, 1941 to March 2, 1946.

EUROPEAN, AFRICAN, MIDDLE EASTERN CAMPAIGN MEDAL
The European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal is awarded for any service performed between December 7, 1941 and March 2, 1946 provided such service was performed in the geographical theater areas of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. For those service members who participated in multiple battle campaigns, service stars are authorized to the decoration.

WORLD WAR II VICTORY MEDAL
This medal commemorates military service during World War II and is awarded to any member of the United States military, including members of the armed forces of the Government of the Philippine Islands, who served on active duty, or as a reservist, between December 7, 1941 and December 31, 1946.

ARMY OF OCCUPATION MEDAL
To be awarded the Army of Occupation Medal, a service member was required to have performed at least thirty consecutive days of military duty within a designated geographical area of military occupation. The Army of Occupation Medal was presented with a campaign clasp, denoting either European or Asian service, depending on the region in which occupation service had been performed.

FIRST ARMY SHOULDER PATCH
The 347th Ordnance Depot Company was transferred to the command of the First Army in January of 1944 in preparation for the Invasion. After the First Army's beachheads were joined up they attacked west, isolating the Cotentin Peninsula, before capturing the port city of Cherbourg. After this they struck south and broke through at Saint-Lô. Shortly after this, the 347th was transferred back to the Third Army.

THIRD ARMY SHOULDER PATCH
From about the middle of August of 1944, the 347th Ordnance Depot Company was part of General Patton's fast-moving Third Army. Patton followed up on the success of the First Army's breakthrough and led a mad dash across France that was only halted by logistical problems just short of the German border. The 347th continued to support The Third Army's push into Germany and on to victory.

HONORABLE DISCHARGE PATCH - RUPTURED DUCK
The Honorable Service Patch and Lapel Pin were awarded to United States military service members who were discharged under honorable conditions during World War II. The button was awarded between September 1939 and December 1946. The button, which depicted an eagle inside a wreath, served as proof to military police that its wearer was not absent without leave.

OVERSEAS BARS
An Overseas Service Bar is a decoration of the United States Army which is displayed as an embroidered gold bar worn horizontally on the right sleeve of the U.S. Army Class A uniform. The original concept of an Overseas Bar began in the First World War with what was known as an Overseas Chevron. Each bar signifies six months of overseas service. In this example, my Grandpa had two years of overseas service.

SERVICE STRIPE
A service stripe, commonly called a hash mark, is a decoration of the United States military which is presented to enlisted members of the U.S. military to denote length of service. The United States Army awards each stripe for three years service, while the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard award each stripe for four years of duty. My Grandpa's single service stripe signifies his three years of Army service.

BRANCH INSIGNIA COLLAR DEVICES
U.S. Army branch insignia badges represent each individual service member’s specific field of service. Each soldier – both enlisted personnel and officers – wear their branch insignia badge on his or her formal uniform (Class A or Army dress blues) denoting their particular skill set. The U.S. enlisted disk is worn on the right collar and the branch insignia on the left. The bomb insignia shown here is for Ordnance personnel.

RANK INSIGNIA - STAFF SERGEANT
Chevrons are V-shaped stripes whose use in the military go back to at least the 12th century. It was a badge of honor and used in heraldry. The British and French used chevrons -- from the French word for "roof" -- to signify length of service. Chevrons officially denoted rank in the U.S. military for the first time in 1817, when cadets at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point wore them on their sleeves.